Sources & Resources on Multicultural Education

This is my virtual file cabinet of articles, videos and other resources I have found useful in my teaching. I hope you find this site helpful.

Recommended Texts

Favorite textbooks for multicultural education.

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Why this Website?

Teaching may not be the oldest profession, but probably the most noble.

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Japanese American Heroes-World War II-Documentary


Published on Sep 25, 2012

“American Heroes” Documentary – ABC-TV

In December, 1941, Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. The US was at war. Americans of Japanese Decent suddenly found themselves labeled “Enemy Alien”. Over 100,000 were rounded up and forced into Relocation Camps. Despite this indecency, something remarkable began to take shape.

Out of the despair, grew a resolve within the Japanese American community. A desire to prove their loyalty to the United States. From behind the barbed wire, young men volunteered for military service by the thousands. The US Army put them in their own segregated unit, combining them with young men from Hawaii, who also had something to prove. Together they formed the 100th infantry battalion…the beginning of what would soon evolve into the 100th/442nd/MIS.

By the end of the war, they became the most decorated unit in US military history. But, more importantly, they helped change the world. History books, shamefully, omit their incredible contributions. “American Heroes” shines light on the brave, patriotic legacy of The Japanese-American Soldier of World War Two.

Produced by David Ono & Jeff MacIntyre/Content Media Group
The show won three Emmy Awards.
2012 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award Winner

**This film is available for public screenings and filmmaker panel discussion. Please visit and contact us for more info.

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Carlos Cortés to Keynote at NAME

Rose HillCarlos Cortés will be the keynote speaker  at the President’s Banquet  on Saturday, October 3, 2015 at the Sheraton New Orleans. This is the 25th anniversary conference of the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME).

“The son of a Mexican Catholic father with aristocratic roots and a mother of Eastern European Jewish descent, Carlos Cortés grew up wedged between cultures, living a childhood in “constant crossfire-straddling borders, balancing loves and loyalties, and trying to fit into a world that wasn’t quite ready.” In some ways, even his family wasn’t quite ready (for him). His request for a bar mitzvah sent his proud father into a cursing rage. He was terrified to bring home the Catholic girl he was dating, for fear of wounding his mother and grandparents. When he tried to join a high school fraternity, Christians wouldn’t take him because he was Jewish, and Jews looked sideways at him because his father was Mexican.

In his new memoir, Rose Hill: An Intermarriage before Its Time, Cortés lovingly chronicles his family’s tumultuous, decades-long spars over religion, class, and culture, from his early years in legally segregated Kansas City during the 1940s to his return to Berkeley (where his parents met) in the 1950s, and to his parents’ separation, reconciliation, deaths, and eventual burials at the Rose Hill Cemetery. Cortés elevates the theme of intermarriage to a new level of complexity in this closely observed and emotionally fraught memoir adapted from his nationally successful one-man play, A Conversation with Alana: One Boy’s Multicultural Rite of Passage.”


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