Language of Appeasement -[ an important read]

Source: https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2017/03/30/colleges-need-language-shift-not-one-you-think-essay#.WPoJcQ6gaj0.facebook

 

Several months later, I hesitate to offer yet another election postmortem for higher education. Like many of you readers, I have read countless such essays from within and beyond the academy. Some people have argued that the rise of white supremacists (they prefer to be called the “alt-right”) was only to be expected given the proliferation of identity politics in higher education. According those observers, by providing limited space and resources on campuses for the acknowledgment and celebration of various social identity groups that are underrepresented in colleges and universities, as well as marginalized across society, it was only a matter of time before white students would want to assert themselves as well.

The only trouble with that view, as was brilliantly enunciated by Cheryl Harris in 1993 in her discourse on whiteness as property, is that the very idea of whiteness and the racialization of white people over and against all others is the invention of propertied, Protestant Christian, Western European settlers in the Americas. Whiteness was the means of preserving their wealth and status within an ideologically theocratical capitalist system. This argument is disingenuous and ahistorical.

Other commentators, such as Mikki Kendall recently, have noted higher education’s failure to educate its students about race and racism. In that argument, white students are rightfully presented as being allowed to believe in their own merits while at the same time denying the meritorious potential of anyone unlike them — particularly those who are members of racially minoritized groups. Despite first-year orientation diversity sessions and general-education requirements including a plethora of options to expose students to diverse perspectives (but few which present a challenge to normative worldviews), most students leave college with the same assumptions with which they entered: that the dominance and overrepresentation of certain people in college, in leadership and among the ranks of the wealthy and envied is natural and optimal. Most students — not even just white students, necessarily — believe that advancement and opportunity is exclusively a function of merit, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, as noted by legal and educational scholar Lani Guinier.

What I have not yet seen in these electoral postmortems seeking to diagnose how working-class white people in the United States seemingly voted against their own economic interests leading to the election of Donald J. Trump is: 1) an acknowledgment by higher education scholars that it was as much the vote of college-educated, middle-class white men and women that informed this presidential election’s outcomes (see here), and 2) that reality is a result of the decision of historically white colleges and universities to engage a politics of appeasement instead of a true liberal education.

Kendall’s prescient observations reflect the effects of this politics of appeasement, except those who are being appeased are not who some pundits, decrying the excessive political liberalism of the academy, have led us to believe. The greatest strength of an institution lies in its ability to persevere over time, with its most fundamental modus operandi challenged but unchanged. That has never been more true of the institution of American higher education as engendered and still practiced by historically white institutions (HWIs).

As I shared during a talk at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently, acknowledgment and celebration of diversity were not the primary goals of the student activists of the 1960s through the 1980s, who pushed for ethnic studies departments, student centers and increased recruitment and retention efforts focused on racially minoritized students, faculty members and staff members. No, it was through such avenues that those generations of activists hoped to inspire institutional transformation through the presence of a critical mass of people of color on campuses.

 

read more ……

NAME 27th Annual International Conference

NAME 27th Annual International Conference

Salt Lake City, Utah

November 1 – 5, 2017
Preconference Institutes – November 1
Post conference – November 5
NAME special conference room rate: $129 per night
(The hotel details will be announced when their registration system is ready to take reservations for the NAME special rate)

Call for Proposals
To download the call for proposals, click here: http://www.nameorg.org/docs/2017_NAME_Call_for_Proposals.pdf

Submit proposals online (http://nameorg.orgno later than 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, March 10, 2017*

XIV Puerto Rican Congress of Research in Education

Citizenship, Education and Work in the Learning and Knowledge Society

March 8, 9 & 10, 2017

Congress Activities

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017

12:00 onwards
Registration
Lobby of Amphitheater #1, College of Education

1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
First Concurrent Panels Session
College of Education

2:30 – 4:00 p.m.
Second Concurrent Panels Session
College of Education

4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Book presentation: New Spanish translation of Max Van Manen’s latest book
(Luis Guillermo Jaramillo, translator)
Amphitheater #3, College of Education

5:00 – 5:30 p.m.
Congress Opening
Amphitheater #1, College of Education

5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Opening Panel
BRIDGING WORLD TENSIONS THROUGH MULTICULTURALISM
William Howe, Jan Perry Evenstad,
Akbarali Thobhani & Carmen Sanjurjo (moderadora),
Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado.
Amphitheater #1, College of Education

Go to: http://congresoeducacion.uprrp.edu/xiv-puerto-rican-congress-on-research-in-education/

 

Author Talk & Book Signing

February 15    7-8:30 PM
Harriet Beecher Stowe Center    Free Event
Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, 77 Forest Street, Hartford, CT 06105

Join author Teja Arboleda and multicultural educator Bill Howe for an interactive program on complex issues for biracial and multiracial kids, their families, and their communities.

Arboleda is the author of Mixed Feelings, Jeni So Many, and In the Shadow of Race…Again.

A family friendly event!
 
 

Multicultural Education in Your Classroom

SOURCE: https://techfeatured.com/5412/multicultural-education-in-your-classroom-2

America has always been referred to as a melting pot, but ideally, it’s a place where we strive to invite everyone to celebrate exactly who they are. As the US population is becoming increasingly diverse and technology makes the world feel increasingly smaller, it is time to make every classroom a multicultural classroom.

What is Multicultural Education?

Multicultural education is more than celebrating Cinco de Mayo with tacos and piñatas or reading the latest biography of Martin Luther King Jr. It is an educational movement built on basic American values such as freedom, justice, opportunity, and equality. It is a set of strategies aimed to address the diverse challenges experienced by rapidly changing U.S. demographics. And it is a beginning step to shifting the balance of power and privilege within the education system.

The goals of multicultural education include:

  • Creating a safe, accepting and successful learning environment for all
  • Increasing awareness of global issues
  • Strengthening cultural consciousness
  • Strengthening intercultural awareness
  • Teaching students that there are multiple historical perspectives
  • Encouraging critical thinking
  • Preventing prejudice and discrimination

Advantages of Multicultural Education

According to the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME), multicultural education:

  • Helps students develop positive self-image.
  • Offers students an equitable educational opportunity.
  • Allows multiple perspectives and ways of thinking.
  • Combats stereotypes and prejudicial behavior.
  • Teaches students to critique society in the interest of social justice.

Road Blocks to Implementing Multicultural Education

Contrary to popular belief, multicultural education is more than cultural awareness, but rather an initiative to encompass all under-represented groups (people of color, women, people with disabilities, etc) and to ensure curriculum and content including such groups is accurate and complete.

Unfortunately, multicultural education is not as easy as a yearly heritage celebration or supplemental unit here and there. Rather, it requires schools to reform traditional curriculum.

Too often, students are misinformed and misguided. Not all textbooks present historical content fully and accurately. For instance, Christopher Columbus is celebrated as the American hero who discovered America. This take on history completely ignores the pre-European history of Native Americans and the devastation that colonization had on them. Some history books are being revised, but often, it’s much easier to teach that “In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue.”

Most curriculums also focus more on North America and Europe than any other region. Most students have learned about genocide through stories of the Holocaust, but do they know that hundreds of thousands of people are being killed in places like Darfur and Rwanda? Despite our close proximity to Latin America, American schools typically spend little time reading Latin American literature or learning about the culture and history?

Thus, multicultural education is most successful when implemented as a schoolwide approach with reconstruction of not only curriculum, but also organizational and institutional policy.

Unfortunately most educational institutions are not prepared to implement multicultural education in their classrooms. Multicultural education requires a staff that is not only diverse, but also culturally competent. Educators must be aware, responsive and embracing of the diverse beliefs, perspectives and experiences. They must also be willing and ready to address issues of controversy.  These issues include, but are not limited to, racism, sexism, religious intolerance, classism, ageism, etc.

What You Can Do in Your Classroom

Just because we’re facing an uphill battle doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take those first steps. To integrate multicultural education in your classroom and your school, you can:

  • Integrate a diverse reading list that demonstrates the universal human experience across cultures
  • Encourage community participation and social activism
  • Go beyond the textbook
  • By supplementing your curriculum with current events and news stories outside the textbook, you can draw parallels between the distant experiences of the past and the world today.
  • Creating multicultural projects that require students to choose a background outside of their own
  • Suggest that your school host an in-service professional development on multi-cultural education in the classroom

Favorite Lessons in Multicultural Education

Analyze issues of racism through pop culture.

Example: Study the affects of WWII for Japanese Americans through political cartoons, movies, photography, etc.

Analyze issues of socioeconomic class through planning and development.

Example: Design a development project with solutions to the needs of those living in poverty stricken communities.

Analyze issues of sexism through media.

Example: Make a scrapbook of stereotypical portrayals of both men and women. Compare both positive and negative stereotypes and determine the struggles they face as a result of these stereotypes.

Recommended Resources:

Books

Becoming Multicultural Educators by Geneva Gay

Beyond Heros and Holidays by Enid Lee

Lies My Teachers Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James Loewen

Professional Development

Teaching Diversity: Influences and Issues in the Classroom

Customize for Your School

Courses & Seminars in Your Area