Category Archives: Achievement Gap

New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Education on Resource Equity

From: U.S. Department of Education
Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2014 9:56 AM
Subject: New Guidance from the U.S. Department of Education on Resource Equity

Dear Colleague:

Today, the U.S. Department of Education, through its Office for Civil Rights (OCR), released guidance in the form of a Dear Colleague Letter to ensure that students have equal access to educational resources. The guidance provides detailed and concrete information to educators on the standards established by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The guidance is one part of President Obama’s larger equity agenda and takes into account the ongoing efforts of states, school districts, and schools to improve equity. All students—regardless of race, color, national origin, or zip code—deserve a high-quality education that includes resources such as academic and extracurricular programs, strong teaching, technology and instructional materials, and safe school facilities.

The guidance is directed to all federal fund recipients that oversee or operate elementary and secondary education programs, including state and local superintendents, school board members, principals, and other education officials. It will help educators, parents, students, and advocates understand how OCR addresses resource equity in our nation’s schools. Today’s guidance builds upon the resource equity guidance issued by the Department in 2001.

  • To read the new Dear Colleague Letter and related materials (including a Resource Equity Fact Sheet, today’s press release, and a list of available technical assistance), please click here.
  • La página de datos sobre recursos de equidad y el comunicado de prensa están disponibles en español aqui.

Please share this information widely with your members, affiliates, and networks.

Thank you,

Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education


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Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion

Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.’” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

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