Textbook on MCE published in Chinese

We are thrilled that our textbook on multicultural education has been translated into Chinese and is available for purchase through Amazon in China. This was unexpected.

Becoming a Multicultural Educator

Developing Awareness, Gaining Skills, and Taking Action
SECOND EDITION

2013 Recipient of Philip C. Chinn Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education

Providing an essential foundation for pre-service and in-service PK-12 educators, this engaging and practical book focuses on essential questions and theoretical concepts about becoming a multicultural educator. Award-winning authors William A. Howe and Penelope L. Lisi bring theory and research to life through numerous activities, exercises, and lesson plans designed to heighten the reader’s cultural awareness, knowledge base, and skill set. Responding to the growing need to increase academic achievement and to prepare teachers to work with diverse populations of students, this text show readers how to incorporate cultural knowledge into more effective classroom practice. The fully updated Second Edition is packed with new activities and exercises to illustrate concepts readers can apply within their own classrooms and school-wide settings.

Emerging Issues and Trends in Education (International Race and Education Series)

I was pleased to write the Foreword for this new publication “Emerging Issues and Trends in Education” edited by Theodore S. Ransaw and Richard Majors and published by Michigan State University Press.

As classrooms across the globe become increasingly more diverse, it is imperative that educators understand how to meet the needs of students with varying demographic backgrounds. Emerging Issues and Trends in Education presents case studies from academics who have all at one point been teachers in K–12 classrooms, addressing topics such as STEM as well as global issues related to race, gender education, education policy, and parental engagement. The contributors take an international approach, including research about Nigerian, Chinese, Native American, and Mexican American classrooms. With a focus on multidisciplinary perspectives, Emerging Issues and Trends in Education is reflective of the need to embrace different ways of looking at problems to improve education for all students.


Ignite Her Curiosity: 25 Books Starring Science-Loving Mighty Girls

 

Ignite Her Curiosity:
25 Books Starring Science-Loving Mighty Girls

rosie4A great way to encourage girls’ interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields is by sharing stories starring girls and women who love science and technology! Seeing female faces as scientists, whether in the lab or out in the field, is a powerful message to girls that these subjects are open to all. And, while introducing them to real-life women in STEM through biographies is important, fictional stories showing science-loving girls and women are another excellent way to entice girls with the unlimited possibilities before them.

With that in mind, we’re showcasing our favorite fictional books for both children and teens starring Mighty Girls who love science, engineering, and math. With options ranging from the fun and fanciful to the more contemplative, you’re sure to discover a title to excite every budding scientist or engineer, girls and boys alike — after all, both need to learn that science is for everyone!

If you’re looking for books for children and teens about real-life female scientists, you can find dozens of titles in our Science Biographies section. And, for toys and science kits to further support her interests, check out the recommendations in our blog posts:Wrapped Up In Science: Top 40 Science Toys for Mighty Girls and Building Her Dreams: Building and Engineering Toys for Mighty Girls.

 

read more ………..

50 Latino Childrens Books You Should Know Share Button

UPDATED August 1st, 2016

 Even though Latinos are the largest U.S. minority group and are predicted to eventually become the majority, school curriculums have been slow to keep up with the nation’s changing demographics. Required reading lists contain few titles by Hispanic authors or with Hispanic characters, despite a thriving Latino children’s and young adult books movement. As book editor Adriana Dominguez points out, “we live in one of the most diverse societies in the world, and our children’s literature has to reflect the world they live in.

Librarian Creates #BlackLivesMatter Booklist for Teens

Source: http://www.slj.com/2016/07/books-media/librarian-creates-blacklivesmatter-booklist-for-teens/

 

In the wake of the tragic killings of two black men by police this week, Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, librarians around the country have been looking for ways to support and educate their communities. Chelsea Couillard-Smith, a librarian for Hennepin County (MN) Library, created a#BlackLivesMatter booklist for teens.

The idea for the booklist begin as Couillard-Smith, who shares a juvenile title on Twitter every week for #FridayReads, thought about recent events and which books might provide a starting point for reflection and conversation. “I really wanted to promote both How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon andAll American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely. It quickly evolved into this list. I selected a small number of titles that I thought would be good conversation starters for teens engaged in discussions about race and justice,” she explained.

Couillard-Smith was inspired by the effort of several other library resource lists and guides. “There are many great resources that I drew on for ideas including the Oakland Public Library’s Black Lives Matter Resource series,” she says.

As for the impact of the #BlackLivesMatter booklist? Couillard-Smith says, “If it gets these books into the hands of a few more teen or adult readers in our region, I’ll be happy.”

The list is reprinted with permission of Hennepin County Library.

READ THIS: #BLACKLIVESMATTER READS FOR TEENS

Teens are naturally curious about current events and their roles as emerging citizens. Including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry titles, this list offers a great starting point for discussions of race, justice, and privilege.

How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon000 How It Went Down

Told through multiple perspectives, this teen novel examines the shooting of a Black teen by a White man. Complex and thought-provoking, it highlights the weaknesses inherent in eyewitness accounts.

 

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brandon Kiely

000 All American BoysJointly written by authors Jason Reynolds and Brandon Kiely, this teen novel follows the experiences of Rashad, a Black teen savagely beaten by a police officer, and Quinn, a White teen who witnessed the attack. As lines are drawn in the community and at school, both teens struggle to make sense of the larger societal forces shaping their lives.

 

 

 

Monster by Walter Dean Myers000 Monster

In this teen novel, a Black 16-year-old on trial as an accessory to murder recounts the path that led him into trouble. As small moral decisions become gateways to larger problems, readers will wrestle with questions of innocence and culpability that are never clearly answered.

 

 

 

000 Wreath for Emmett TillA Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson

In this heroic crown of sonnets, Nelson asks readers to bear witness to the brutal murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a Black teen lynched in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a White woman. The questions raised about our country’s racial history still resonate, and provide much for readers to discuss in the context of current events.

 

 

 

read more ——