Grants aim to increase California’s supply of bilingual teachers


ALISON YIN FOR EDSOURCEThe 2017-18 state budget includes $5 million in new funding to address teacher training specifically in shortage areas like bilingual education.
The California Department of Education has awarded Bilingual Teacher Professional Development grants – each in the amount of $625,000 – to four school districts and four county offices of education throughout the state.

The grants were awarded to the Anaheim Union High School District, Oak Grove School District, Patterson Joint Unified School District, Riverside Unified School District, and to the Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Bernardino and San Luis Obispo county offices of education.

The funding is expected to increase the numbers of bilingual teachers by providing training to teams of teachers, principals, and instructional assistants. The program aims to increase the number of teachers who obtain a bilingual authorization. It also wants to help return to the classroom teachers who have bilingual authorization but are no longer teaching bilingual or multilingual classes.

Spanish-Speaking Teachers Getting Special Training To Meet California’s Demand For More Bilingual Teachers
The $5 million in grant money was added to the state budget to help alleviate a bilingual teacher shortage anticipated after the passage of Prop. 58. Even before the grants were awarded, many districts and community colleges were adding bilingual professional development programs to meet the demand.

Los Angeles Unified estimated in August that it employs more than 3,000 out-of-practice bilingual teachers, according to Hilda Maldonado, executive director of the district’s multilingual and multicultural education department.

More information about the grants and program requirements is here.

Esta Tierra Es Tuya (This Land Is Your Land)


“Woody Guthrie wrote this classic in 1940 and originally had a message of inclusiveness. It was inspired by the plight of “Okies,” displaced Great Plains farmers unwelcomed in California when they sought work during the 1930’s Dust Bowl Depression Era. It was dramatized in the book and movie, The Grapes of Wrath. This Spanish version was written by Sones de Mexico Ensemble. Its norteño version remains relevant 71 later and speaks of America’s debate over immigration.”