The Five Most Common Native Languages of English-Learners

Source: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/learning-the-language/2018/10/most_english_learners_speak_these_five_languages.html

 

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The Five Most Common Native Languages of English-Learners

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Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Haitian Creole are the top five home languages for English-language learners in the nation’s K-12 public schools, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Education.

“The Biennial Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Title III State Formula Grant Program” offers an in-depth look at the prevalence of the languages among the nation’s K-12 English-learner population.

Altogether, more than 80 percent of the nation’s English-learners are native speakers of one of those languages, but there is lots of linguistic diversity among the nation’s English-learners: 44 languages were represented among the individual states’ top five most commonly spoken languages during the 2013-14 school year, the report found.

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The study, delivered to Congress at the end of September, uses data from the 2012-13 and 2013-14 academic years to examine the state of English-learner education in the United States.

Here’s an overview of the data on the most common native languages of English-learners:

1.       Spanish

In the 2013-14 school year, 10 states reported that at least 80 percent of the English-learners enrolled in public K-12 schools were native Spanish speakers. Here’s a look:

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All but five states reported Spanish as the most common language for English-learners. Those five states, along with the most common languages in each, are: Alaska (Yup’ik languages); Hawaii (Iloko); Maine (Somali); Montana (German); and Vermont (Nepali).

2.       Arabic

The number of English-learners reported as speaking Arabic increased by 157 percent between the 2006-07 and 2013-14 school years. The 2006-07 school year marked the first time the biennial report listed the number of Arabic-speaking English-learners. Even with the growth, Arabic speakers represent just about 2.5 percent of all English-learners.

Overall, Arabic is among the top five native languages for English-learners in 36 states and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. Here’s a look:

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3.       Chinese

The number of English-learners reported as speaking Chinese increased by 195 percent between the 2006-07 and 2013-14 school years. The 2006-07 school year marked the first time the biennial report listed the number of English-learners with Asian or Pacific Islander languages. Here’s a look:

Capture Asian Pacific Islander Languages.PNGOverall, native Chinese-speaking students represent about 2.4 percent of all English-learners. The report does not distinguish between Cantonese and Mandarin speakers.

4.       Vietnamese

The percentage of English-learners whose native language is Vietnamese is 1.9 percent, the same percentage as it was in the 2006-07 school year. However, the overall number of Vietnamese-speaking English-learners has declined over that period, dropping from nearly 86,000 to about 80,000—a more than 5 percent decline.

The decline of English-speakers of Hmong, another Asian-Pacific Islander language, took an even more dramatic drop, falling by 57 percent. (See the chart above for more detail)

5.       Haitian Creole

Haitian Creole replaced Hmong in the category of five most common languages spoken by English-learners nationwide in the 2012-13 school year. The Haitian Creole-speaking English-learners are largely concentrated in four states, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. Here’s a look:

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Haitian Creole remained among the top five languages during the 2013-14 school year, despite a 4 percent decline from the previous year that brought the population down to roughly 35,500.

What About American Indian and Alaska Native languages?

A declining number of states identify an American Indian or Alaska Native language among the five most common native languages of English-learners, dropping from 10 in 2012-13 to seven in 2013-14.

The seven states where an American Indian or Alaska Native language were among the most common languages are: Alaska, Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Utah. The states that dropped from the list are: Idaho, North Dakota, and Wyoming.

The biennial report captures data on eight American Indian and Alaska native languages or language groups.

Here’s a copy of the full report:

Biennial Report to Congress… by on Scribd</p >

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Images: U.S. Department of Education, office of English-language acquisition

Photo Credit: Kindergartner Ava Josephine Mikel and teacher Priscilla Joseph dance to Haitian music during a game of “freeze dance” at Toussaint L’Ouverture Academy, a Haitian Creole dual-language program at Mattahunt Elementary School in Boston. More dual-language programs are cropping up in districts around the country.

–Gretchen Ertol for Education Week

Grants aim to increase California’s supply of bilingual teachers

Source: https://edsource.org/2017/grants-aim-to-increase-californias-supply-of-bilingual-teachers/591616

ALISON YIN FOR EDSOURCEThe 2017-18 state budget includes $5 million in new funding to address teacher training specifically in shortage areas like bilingual education.
The California Department of Education has awarded Bilingual Teacher Professional Development grants – each in the amount of $625,000 – to four school districts and four county offices of education throughout the state.

The grants were awarded to the Anaheim Union High School District, Oak Grove School District, Patterson Joint Unified School District, Riverside Unified School District, and to the Los Angeles, Sacramento, San Bernardino and San Luis Obispo county offices of education.

The funding is expected to increase the numbers of bilingual teachers by providing training to teams of teachers, principals, and instructional assistants. The program aims to increase the number of teachers who obtain a bilingual authorization. It also wants to help return to the classroom teachers who have bilingual authorization but are no longer teaching bilingual or multilingual classes.

Spanish-Speaking Teachers Getting Special Training To Meet California’s Demand For More Bilingual Teachers
The $5 million in grant money was added to the state budget to help alleviate a bilingual teacher shortage anticipated after the passage of Prop. 58. Even before the grants were awarded, many districts and community colleges were adding bilingual professional development programs to meet the demand.

Los Angeles Unified estimated in August that it employs more than 3,000 out-of-practice bilingual teachers, according to Hilda Maldonado, executive director of the district’s multilingual and multicultural education department.

More information about the grants and program requirements is here.

Esta Tierra Es Tuya (This Land Is Your Land)

 

“Woody Guthrie wrote this classic in 1940 and originally had a message of inclusiveness. It was inspired by the plight of “Okies,” displaced Great Plains farmers unwelcomed in California when they sought work during the 1930’s Dust Bowl Depression Era. It was dramatized in the book and movie, The Grapes of Wrath. This Spanish version was written by Sones de Mexico Ensemble. Its norteño version remains relevant 71 later and speaks of America’s debate over immigration.”