10 Racist US Supreme Court Rulings

Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/racist-supreme-court-rulings-721615

by Tom Head
Updated March 03, 2017
The Supreme Court has issued some fantastic civil rights rulings over the years, but these aren’t among them. Here are ten of the most astonishingly racist Supreme Court rulings in American history, in chronological order.

01
of 10
Dred Scott v. Sandford (1856)
When a slave petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for his freedom, the Court ruled against him—also ruling that the Bill of Rights didn’t apply to African Americans. If it did, the majority ruling argued, then African Americans would be permitted “the full liberty of speech in public and in private,” “to hold public meetings upon political affairs,” and “to keep and carry arms wherever they went.” In 1856, both the justices in the majority and the white aristocracy they represented found this idea too horrifying to contemplate. In 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment made it law. What a difference a war makes!

02
of 10
Pace v. Alabama (1883)
In 1883 Alabama, interracial marriage meant two to seven years’ hard labor in a state penitentiary. When a black man named Tony Pace and a white woman named Mary Cox challenged the law, the Supreme Court upheld it—on grounds that the law, inasmuch as it prevented whites from marrying blacks and blacks from marrying whites, was race-neutral and did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment. The ruling was finally overturned in Loving v. Virginia (1967). More »

03
of 10
The Civil Rights Cases (1883)
Q: When did the Civil Rights Act, which mandated an end to racial segregation in public accommodations, pass? A: Twice. Once in 1875, and once in 1964.

We don’t hear much about the 1875 version because it was struck down by the Supreme Court in the Civil Rights Cases ruling of 1883, made up of five separate challenges to the 1875 Civil Rights Act. Had the Supreme Court simply upheld the 1875 civil rights bill, U.S. civil rights history would have been dramatically different.

04
of 10
Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)
Most people are familiar with the phrase “separate but equal,” the never-achieved standard that defined racial segregation until Brown v. Board of Education (1954), but not everybody knows that it comes from this ruling, where Supreme Court justices bowed to political pressure and found an interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment that would still allow them to keep public institutions segregated. More »

05
of 10
Cumming v. Richmond (1899)
When three black families in Richmond County, Virginia faced the closing of the area’s only public black high school, they petitioned the Court to allow their children to finish their education at the white high school instead. It only took the Supreme Court three years to violate its own “separate but equal” standard by establishing that if there was no suitable black school in a given district, black students would simply have to do without an education. More »

06
of 10
Ozawa v. United States (1922)
A Japanese immigrant, Takeo Ozawa, attempted to become a full U.S. citizen, despite a 1906 policy limiting naturalization to whites and African Americans. Ozawa’s argument was a novel one: Rather than challenging the constitutionality of the statute himself (which, under the racist Court, would have probably been a waste of time anyway), he simply attempted to establish that Japanese Americans were white. The Court rejected this logic.

07
of 10
United States v. Thind (1923)
An Indian-American U.S. Army veteran named Bhagat Singh Thind attempted the same strategy as Takeo Ozawa, but his attempt at naturalization was rejected in a ruling establishing that Indians, too, are not white. Well, the ruling technically referred to “Hindus” (ironic considering that Thind was actually a Sikh, not a Hindu), but the terms were used interchangeably at the time. Three years later he was quietly granted citizenship in New York; he went on to earn a Ph.D. and teach at the University of California at Berkeley.

08
of 10
Lum v. Rice (1927)
In 1924, Congress passed the Oriental Exclusion Act to dramatically reduce immigration from Asia—but Asian Americans born in the United States were still citizens, and one of these citizens, a nine-year-old girl named Martha Lum, faced a catch-22. Under compulsory attendance laws, she had to attend school—but she was Chinese and she lived in Mississippi, which had racially segregated schools and not enough Chinese students to warrant funding a separate Chinese school. Lum’s family sued to try to allow her to attend the well-funded local white school, but the Court would have none of it.

09
of 10
Hirabayashi v. United States (1943)
During World War II, President Roosevelt issued an executive order severely restricting the rights of Japanese Americans and ordering 110,000 to be relocated to internment camps. Gordon Hirabayashi, a student at the University of Washington, challenged the executive order before the Supreme Court–and lost.

10
of 10
Korematsu v. United States (1944)
Fred Korematsu also challenged the executive order and lost in a more famous and explicit ruling that formally established that individual rights are not absolute and may be suppressed at will during wartime. The ruling, generally considered one of the worst in the history of the Court, has been almost universally condemned over the past six decades.

University of Michigan – Director of the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center

Position Announcement

 

University of Michigan

Director of the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center

 

The University of Michigan, one of the great public research universities in the nation and the world, seeks an energetic leader, skilled administrator, and collaborative campus partner to serve as Director of the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center.

 

From the time of its founding in 1817, the University of Michigan has developed into a national model of a complex, diverse, and comprehensive institution of higher learning that supports excellence in research; provides outstanding undergraduate, graduate, and professional education; and demonstrates commitment to public service and engagement. It is one of only two institutions consistently ranked among the nation’s top ten public universities. Many of its departments and professional schools are ranked among the top ten in the country. The University has an annual budget of over $7 billion and $1.3 billion in annual research expenditures. The Ann Arbor campus is located 35 miles west of Detroit, with regional campuses located in the cities of Dearborn and Flint.

 

The William Monroe Trotter House officially opened its doors as a Black student cultural center in 1971 and was named after publisher and civil-rights activist William Monroe Trotter. In 1981, the mission of the Trotter House was expanded to serve all students and, in 2004, its name was changed to the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center. Today, the Trotter Center is a vibrant hub that welcomes and serves all members of the campus community. In the fall of 2018, the Trotter Center will move to a new, specially designed 20,000-square-foot building located at the heart of the University’s central campus. Its new location will be emblematic of the important role the Trotter Center plays in the life of the institution. The new Trotter Center will serve as an iconic and programmatic symbol for all students, as an open and inclusive facility that fosters intercultural engagement and strengthens connections between and among communities, as a supportive home and environment to those committed to social justice and diversity, and as a space that celebrates the tradition and history of the Trotter Center and the activism of students.

 

The Director of the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center will be responsible for developing, directing, and administering all operations, programming, services, and resources that advance the mission of the Trotter Center and the core values of the University of Michigan and its Division of Student Life. Characteristic duties and responsibilities include: envisioning the next era of excellence and innovation for the Trotter Center and working with students, faculty, staff, senior administrators, alumni, and other stakeholders to establish support and capacity to implement this vision; partnering with academic and administrative units to implement initiatives that enhance student development, multicultural education, and campus climate; working primarily with students and student organizations and with other internal and external constituencies to provide activities, programs, and intellectual exchanges that engage diverse perspectives and identities, promote cultural competence, enrich campus climate, and foster a culture of mutual respect and inclusion; serving as a mentor and advocate for students, providing direct support and connecting them with the many resources available at the institution; working creatively with others to anticipate and provide constructive responses to challenging student and community issues; overseeing facility operations, marketing, reservation processes, maintenance, security, and other functions; managing the unit’s budget and supporting fundraising and grant development efforts; and coordinating the assessment and continuous improvement of operations, programs, and services. Reporting to the Associate Vice President for Student Life, the Director will supervise two full-time staff and approximately 30 graduate and undergraduate student staff and interns. The University of Michigan is actively engaged in a capital campaign designed to increase resources for major diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives, including the Trotter Center.

 

Minimum requirements include a master’s degree and five years of related experience; a doctorate is preferred, as is eight or more years of progressive experience in student life, multicultural education, and/or a related field. The University of Michigan is seeking a thoughtful, energetic, and highly collaborative administrator who demonstrates a passion for working with students and helping them flourish on campus, is adept at both strategy and operations, and has a track record of advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education. The position requires an experienced leader of people and programs who communicates effectively, manages resources wisely, acts with the highest degree of integrity, and inspires the confidence and trust of others. The ideal candidate will demonstrate the commitment and capacity to serve as a caring adviser and mentor for students, particularly those from underserved and underrepresented groups, and the interpersonal skills, diplomacy, political savvy, and sensitivity to engage effectively with all constituencies, build consensus for change, and thrive in a highly complex and decentralized environment.

 

Review of applications will begin November 27, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled. A resume and cover letter explaining how the applicant meets the qualifications specified in this announcement may be submitted via the Spelman Johnson website at www.spelmanjohnson.com/open-positions. Confidential inquiries and nominations for this position may be emailed to James M. Norfleet at jmn@spelmanjohnson.com. Applicants needing reasonable accommodation to participate in the application process should contact Spelman Johnson at 413-529-2895.

 

Spelman Johnson

University of Michigan – Director of the William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center

James M. Norfleet, Search Associate

 

Visit the University of Michigan website at www.umich.edu

 

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Textbook on MCE published in Chinese

We are thrilled that our textbook on multicultural education has been translated into Chinese and is available for purchase through Amazon in China. This was unexpected.

Becoming a Multicultural Educator

Developing Awareness, Gaining Skills, and Taking Action
SECOND EDITION

2013 Recipient of Philip C. Chinn Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education

Providing an essential foundation for pre-service and in-service PK-12 educators, this engaging and practical book focuses on essential questions and theoretical concepts about becoming a multicultural educator. Award-winning authors William A. Howe and Penelope L. Lisi bring theory and research to life through numerous activities, exercises, and lesson plans designed to heighten the reader’s cultural awareness, knowledge base, and skill set. Responding to the growing need to increase academic achievement and to prepare teachers to work with diverse populations of students, this text show readers how to incorporate cultural knowledge into more effective classroom practice. The fully updated Second Edition is packed with new activities and exercises to illustrate concepts readers can apply within their own classrooms and school-wide settings.

Millennials Believe Racism Can Be Combated Through Education Reform

Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/10/prweb14806277.htm

 

A recent study by Pew concludes that over 58% of Americans believe racism is a “big problem” in society. H. Richard Milner, a noted researcher and expert on race and education at the University of Pittsburgh says that, “education is the key to addressing inequity and racism in society,” and if we are not, “working in education to combat racism, we are complicit in maintaining inequity and the status quo.” Are educators prepared and willing to take this on? C.M. Rubin (Founder of CMRubinWorld) opened up the conversation on racism and the role of education with Millennials around the globe.

Harmony Siganporia notes, “Any nation that can stomach the principle of caste, which is the most brutal ‘classification’ of human beings based on birth anywhere in the world, cannot help but differentiate, and differentiate repeatedly, on the basis of every parameter society can construct in a desperate and insular bid to separate ‘us’ from ‘them.’” Dominique Dryding believes that until educational institutions, “take the lived experiences of their student bodies seriously and recognize that racism does not only include name calling and physical exclusion, racism in schools and universities will not end.” Guest blogger Salathia Carr writes, “Judgment is very easy to make when you’re not living that way. But, if we force discussions about inequality from the very first history class we take, you cannot avoid it.”

Read the full article here

The Millennial Bloggers are based all over the world. They are innovators in entrepreneurship, journalism, education, entertainment, health and wellbeing and academic scholarship. They are Alusine Barrie, Sajia Darwish, James Kernochan, Kamna Kathuria, Jacob Deleon Navarrete, Reetta Heiskanen, Shay Wright, Isadora Baum, Wilson Carter III, Francisco Hernandez, Erin Farley, Dominique Alyssa Dryding, Harry Glass, Harmony Siganporia and Bonnie Chiu.

The mission of CMRubinWorld is to ask the important questions, share the most innovative ideas and ultimately be a bridge builder between the past and the future of learning.

CMRubinWorld launched in 2010 to explore what kind of education would prepare students to succeed in a rapidly changing globalized world. Its award winning series, The Global Search for Education, is a highly regarded trailblazer in the renaissance of 21st century education, and occupies a widely respected place in the pulse of key issues facing every nation and the collective future of all children. It connects today’s top thought leaders with a diverse global audience of parents, students and educators. Its highly readable platform allows for discourse concerning our highest ideals and the sustainable solutions we must engineer to achieve them. C. M. Rubin has produced hundreds of interviews and articles discussing an extensive array of topics under a singular vision: when it comes to the world of children, there is always more work to be done.

For more information on CMRubinWorld

Follow @CMRubinWorld  on Twitter

Contact Information

David Wine

CMRubinWorld

david(at)cmrubinworld(dot)com

Private Tour to Greece – summer of 2018

I am organizing my 13th or 14th international tour. If you are interested in coming along, please email me at bill@billhowe.org. The dates are July 22nd to August 5th, 2018 with the trip starting in Athens and ending in Santorini. Teachers get CEU credit at no charge. Graduate credit available for a fee. A lesson plan is provided for you at the end of the tour so you can do a presentation for faculty or students. Since this is a private tour, you need to talk to me first so I can alert the travel company.

Here is the trip website: https://www.geeo.org/tours/GreeceHowe/