Free resource – a teacher professional development training on integrating LGBTQ History into Elementary, Middle and High School curricula.

I wanted to call to your attention a great and free resource – a teacher professional development training on integrating LGBTQ History into Elementary, Middle and High School curricula. Please share this opportunity with any teacher you think might be interested. This is being run by a group called History UnErased, which received a substantial grant from the Library of Congress, and is offering full scholarships for 3-day August workshops at Lowell National Historical Park.

Click here for more information: https://historyunerased.com/professional-development/

 

Teachers from other states are welcome.


Reimagining Equality in Our Classrooms, Culture and Consciousness
·        Study LGBTQ history with expert historians and archivists using primary and secondary source resources from the Library of Congress and ONE Archives Foundation at USC Libraries visual history exhibits
·        Address potential miscues and problems that the integration of LGBTQ content may present with psychosocial and behavioral specialists
·        Collaborate with colleagues regarding implementation strategies of LGBTQ content and its connections to curriculum standards and frameworks – using the Library of Congress resources and ONE Archives Foundation visual history exhibits

 

History UnErased workshops are held at Lowell National Historical Park, Lowell, Massachusetts (8:30 – 3:30) and funded through the generous support of the Library of Congress. Three-day workshops include breakfasts, lunches, materials, expert guest speakers and more… Program details will be emailed to you within one week of registration submission. (Library of Congress scholarships are available to classroom teachers, librarians and administrative staff.) 

 

All You Need Is Love? highlights a teen living in a world that exists in opposition to the one we live in now.

All You Need Is Love? highlights a teen living in a world that exists in opposition to the one we live in now.

In this short, the terms “gay” and “straight” and the conceptions and cultural stigmas attached to them are completely reversed. What makes this video so powerful is its inclusion of family and community, showing that intolerance can fester in any number of places. Honest performances and a beautiful message, this short film is one not to miss.

Gay Will Never Be the New Black: What James Baldwin Taught Me About My White Privilege

I'd never even heard the name James Baldwin until my first semester at Union Theological Seminary. As a white, middle-class American, I was the product of a predominantly white, middle-class education that didn't assign The Fire Next Time and Giovanni's Room, two of Baldwin's masterpieces, alongside 1984 and The Scarlet Letter. It wasn't until I moved to New York and took a class on Baldwin's life and writings that I was transformed by the black, same-gender-loving, 20th-century author's honesty and candor.

Baldwin grew up on New York's Fifth Avenue — not the Fifth Avenue of Saks and the Social Register but the Fifth Avenue of 1930s Harlem, where black Americans like Ellison's invisible man were kept at a safe, 60-block distance from fearful, prejudiced whites. The child preacher turned writer experienced racism and homophobia firsthand and possessed an unflinching eye for the injustices of American life. Unlike many authors I have read before, Baldwin was filled with love, courage and an unrelenting imagination. It was precisely because of his abiding care for his country that Baldwin retained the right to critique her so harshly. He had faith that the United States could be better, not only for him but for all people.

 

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