“diversity-related” graduate education programs

Dear Colleagues,

Through its Cultural Studies, International Education, and Multicultural Education (CSIEME) program, the Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education (COE) at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) is please to offer the following “diversity-related” graduate education programs—please share this information widely!
An M.Ed. (non-thesis) and an M.S. (thesis) in Multicultural Education.
An Ed.D. and a Ph.D. in Cultural Studies, International Education, and Multicultural Education.
A Chief Diversity Officers in Higher Education (CDOHE) graduate certificate [housed in the Department of Educational Psychology & Higher Education, collaboratively coordinated with the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
A Social Justice Studies (SJS) graduate certificate [housed in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program, collaboratively coordinated with the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs and the Department of Sociology (in the College of Liberal Arts (CLA)), with additional partners in the Department of Educational Psychology & Higher Education (COE) and the Department of History (CLA)].
Coming soon! A post-master’s graduate certificate in Multicultural Education [housed in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
Coming soon! A post-bachelor’s graduate certificate in Multicultural Education [h oused in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
For more information on these programs, please visit: http://tl.unlv.edu/content/csieme/
Graduate assistantships may be available at both academic levels based on funding allocations, departmental teaching needs, and the number of students interested.
Again, please share this information widely with interested students and colleagues!
Best,
Christine
———
Christine Clark, Ed.D.
Professor & Senior Scholar in Multicultural Education
Founding Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion
346A Carlson Education Building (CEB)
Department of Teaching and Learning
College of Education
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box #453005
Las Vegas, NV 89154.3005
702.895.3888 Office Telephone
702.895.2944 Office Facsimile

Perceptions of Muslims in the United States: a Review

Source: http://www.gallup.com/OPINION/GALLUP/187664/PERCEPTIONS-MUSLIMS-UNITED-STATES-REVIEW.ASPX?UTM_SOURCE=ALERT&UTM_MEDIUM=EMAIL&UTM_CONTENT=MORELINK&UTM_CAMPAIGN=SYNDICATION

By Mohamed Younis

DECEMBER 11, 2015

The terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California, has brought the ongoing conversation about Muslim Americans, identity and extremism back onto the national stage. Over the past several years, Gallup has conducted a number of studies on perceptions of Muslims and Islam among the American public. Gallup has also studied the Muslim-American community itself in comparison to other religious groups in the U.S., most recently using 2015 Gallup Daily tracking data.

On Terrorism:

In the wake of the San Bernardino attack, an old debate about the so-called responsibility of Muslims to condemn acts of terror has gained steam. U.S. faith groups have historically been divided on whether Muslim Americans are more obligated to speak out against terrorism than other groups, with Muslims themselves also divided on the issue. Yet when it comes to their own views, Muslim Americans are the most likely of all religious groups to disavow military as well as individual or group attacks against civilians, with large majorities saying these are never justified.

On Prejudice:

Four in 10 Americans (43%) in previous Gallup surveys have self-reported harboring some degree of prejudice toward Muslims. Prejudice toward Muslims was higher than self-reported prejudice toward any of the various religious groups tested. Additionally, nearly half (or more) of respondents from all religious groups agree with the statement that “most Americans are prejudiced toward Muslim Americans.” Muslims are also the most likely group among religious groups in the U.S. to report having personally experienced racial or religious discrimination.

On Loyalty to the U.S.:

While the debate about Muslim Americans’ loyalty and role in countering extremism may highlight some of the public mistrust regarding Muslim Americans, nearly half (or more) of all religious groups in the U.S. recognize that Muslims do face considerable prejudice, and a majority of all groups say Muslims are also loyal to the U.S.

On Faith:

Gallup’s research has shown that Muslim Americans identify equally with their faith and country.

On al Qaeda:

Additionally, a majority of all religious groups in the U.S. disagree with the statement that “Muslims living in this country are sympathetic to al Qaeda.” Other than Muslims (92%), Americans with no religious affiliation (75%) and Jews (70%) are most likely to disagree with the statement that Muslim Americans harbor sympathies for al Qaeda.

On Confidence in U.S. Institutions:

Interestingly, Americans who think their Muslim peers are loyal to the U.S. are more likely than those who question this loyalty to have confidence in a number of major U.S. institutions such as the judicial system (63% vs. 41%), the honesty of elections (49% vs. 27%), the media (29% vs. 14%), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (73% vs. 61%) and the local police (82% vs. 75%).

This apparent deficit of confidence in national institutions among those who say Muslim Americans are not loyal to the U.S. is particularly interesting considering the current political discourse. In fact, government incompetence has been a major campaign theme of candidates, such as Donald Trump and Ben Carson, who have been most vocal on questioning the loyalty of Muslims and the compatibility of being a Muslim and a patriotic American. Statements implying that Muslims must reject their faith to run for president or should be treated with broad-brush suspicion in the country’s immigration process have often come from campaigns whose major themes include a focus on distrust of government as well as government incompetence. Donald Trump’s suggestion on banning all Muslim entry to the U.S. is presented based on the reasoning that government has failed at executing a more thorough and security-focused immigration process.

On the Possibility of a Muslim President:

Interestingly, 60% of Americans overall say they would vote for an otherwise well-qualified Muslim for president, statistically on par with the percentage who would vote for an atheist (58%) but lower than the percentage who would vote for a Catholic (93%), a Jew (91%), a Mormon (81%) or an evangelical Christian (73%).

On the Diversity of Muslims in the U.S.:

As the discourse in the U.S. continues to focus on Muslim identity, loyalty and Muslims’ role in countering extremism, Gallup data reveal a Muslim-American population that skews young and is racially diverse.

A detailed analysis of the profile of 943 Muslims interviewed as part of Gallup Daily tracking in 2015 shows that Americans who identify their religion as Muslim are the youngest and most racially diverse religious group in the U.S. Some 42% of Muslims are 18 to 29, compared with 17% of Protestants and 19% of Catholics who fall into the same age bracket. At the other end of the age spectrum, only 4% of Muslims are 65 and older, compared with 24% of Protestants and 20% of Catholics. Muslims are the only religious group to lack a majority race or ethnicity, with 36% self-identifying as non-Hispanic black, 27% as non-Hispanic white, 21% as Asian and 8% as Hispanic.

On Muslims’ Life Evaluations:

Muslim Americans’ life evaluations are not significantly higher or lower than those of other religious groups in the United States. Data from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index for 2015 show that 56% of Muslims rate their lives highly enough to be classified as thriving and 4% suffering, roughly the same as several other religious groups, with the exception of Jews, both within the overall community and among young adults. Jews have the highest thriving rates of any religious group, with 64% thriving and 2% suffering. By way of comparison, 55% of all Americans are thriving and 4% are suffering.

On Political Leanings of Muslims:

The political leanings of Muslim Americans also paint an interesting picture. At 66%, the percentage of Muslims who identify with or lean toward the Democratic Party is the highest of any major religious group, ahead of the 60% of Jewish Americans who identify as or lean Democratic. This contrasts with 17% of Mormons, 43% of Catholics and 39% of Protestants who identify as or lean toward the Democrats. On the other hand, Muslim Americans have the lowest percentage of any religious group who identify as or lean Republican, at 16%. By comparison, 31% of Jews, 72% of Mormons, 41% of Catholics and 48% of Protestants identify as or lean Republican.

On Religiosity:

Muslims’ religiosity — based on self-reported religious service attendance (42% at least weekly) and importance of religion (79%) — is on par with Protestants’ religiosity (41% and 81%, respectively), but is less than that of Mormons (87% and 66%, respectively), the most religious group in the U.S.

In the coming days, stay tuned for new Gallup data on the American public’s perceptions of the threat of terrorism in light of the recent attacks.

 

Just Say “No” to Popcorn Reading

Source: http://www.effectiveteachingpd.com/blog/2012/11/20/just-say-no-to-popcorn-reading.html

One question often posed to me by teachers is, “How can I engage and break up the monotony of long sections of oral reading in class?”  Great question!  As educators, we know the importance of reading aloud in class; whether a student is in 3rd grade or AP Calculus, hearing someone skillfully read sections of text promotes fluency and comprehension of both fiction and non-fiction.  However, reading aloud can be monotonous if we use the same method or only have one or two readers involved, as it renders most of the students passive.

Popcorn reading (randomly calling on students to read aloud-whether their hand is raised or not) is a common practice, though I recommend the strategy be banned or at least modified in the following way.  Some teachers assign a different section of text to be read by each student, the first student then begins reading and others don’t follow along and comprehend because surprise, they are all reading the section in which they were assigned. If a teacher insists on doing reading like this in class, then please allow students a few minutes to read and rehearse their part before anyone starts reading aloud.  This way, students will not be anxious about reading their section as they have already practiced, and once prepared, they can focus and follow along with the current readers.

Popcorn reading, when used as a classroom management tactic to “catch” those who are not paying attention, in my opinion, should never be used. It increases the “affective filter” or level of discomfort in the classroom as many don’t like to be “put on the spot” to read aloud, especially when so many of our students struggle with reading in general.  Reading should never be used as a management tool or punishment.  For more reasons as to why this method is frowned upon, please read Todd Finley’s article , “11 Alternatives to Round Robin Reading.”  

read more ………..

 

10 Books I Wish My White Teachers Had Read

Source: http://www.bustle.com/articles/153390-10-books-i-wish-my-white-teachers-had-read?utm_source=FBOnsite&utm_medium=Facebook&utm_campaign=1

I can only remember having two non-white teachers during my time in school. From my early years at underfunded public schools comprised mostly of Black and Latino students to my later years at private schools with largely white student populations, my experience as a Black student learning from white teachers has ranged from incredibly inspiring to incredibly damaging.

As a Black student in public schools, I had a white art teacher give me a failing grade on an essay project as he explained to me that graffiti isn’t art. I was kicked out of classrooms for “having an attitude,” rolling my eyes, playing with my braids, or wearing a gang-related shirt (it was FUBU). Once, I was kicked out of class for telling (and attempting to show) an incredulous math teacher that I already knew how to do the work he was condescendingly explaining… again. I had white principal who refused to sign the recommendation letter I needed to complete my application for a private high school. Let’s not forget the metal detectors, police officers, and zero-tolerance treatment that make many of these public schools feel more like prisons than learning centers.

But fancy private schools aren’t off the hook, either. As one of few Black students at the private schools I attended, I had white teachers show photos of apes and compare them to African women. I had a history teacher touch my braids and ask, in front of the entire class, “Is this horse hair? I hear that’s how they do that.”

But I was lucky. The experiences of many other students of color in schools often includes dropouts, pushouts, arrests, even violence at the hands of their educators.

Being a teacher is tough. Being a white teacher of students whose experience is foreign to you is probably even harder. But I’ve had amazing white teachers, too. I’ve had white teachers who came to my birthday parties even though it was the in “the hood,” white teachers who encouraged me to explore topics about my culture within the curriculum, and white teachers who didn’t treat me like a unicorn for solving a math problem. In fact, my favorite teacher was one who (after my principal essentially sabotaged my application to private school) explained the situation to the school and managed to get them to let me test in despite the incomplete application. She was white, too.

Unfortunately, it’s true that the whole U.S. education system is broken, especially for students of color, but what one teacher does in her own classroom can make a world of difference. Teachers have a responsibility to examine their own prejudices and learn about the experiences of and oppressive forces working against the students they are teaching. Because when we walk into a classroom, both as teachers and as students, we don’t magically leave our struggles and life experiences at the door.

Maybe you can’t change the whole system, maybe rigid curricula and standardized tests have your hands tied, but, as some of my teachers showed me, reading a book can go a long way. These are some of the books that I wishmy white teachers had read.

1. For White Folks Who Teach In the Hood by Christopher Emdin

Why oh why couldn’t this book have been published ages ago? The strategies put forth in Emdin’s book are brilliant for any teacher, but its call for white teachers “in the hood” to reassess the ways that they see students versus how students see themselves is especially crucial for white teachers of students of color. An educator himself, Emdin offers real solutions to help white teachers check their privilege and connect with their students.

2. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schoolsby Monique Morris

This book! So many of the things in this book resonated deeply with my own experience. Morris shines the light on a group that is often neglected in discussions of education issues. She highlights the many ways that Black girls are misunderstood, neglected, and criminalized not just by the system as a whole, but also by teachers who fail to see past stereotypes of Black women as “sassy” or “loud.” She also touches on the experiences of Black women outside of the classroom and how they play out in the classroom.

3. Black Stats by Monique Morris

Yes, it is crucial to look at Black students as actual humans rather than just data points or statistics, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t know your stats, too. Morris’ heavily researched book looks at Black life by the numbers, busting up stereotypes and biases with numbers that prove certain commonly held beliefs are flat out wrong.The New Press actually followed this book with a Latino Stats book by Idelisse Malavé and Esti Giordani, as well.

4. Between The World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

There’s a reason this book is a bestseller. It’s one of the most poignant works on Black life today. Coates’ writing about the experience of growing up and raising a young Black son in today’s climate articulates the feelings of a whole generation.

5. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

There’s a reason protesters at Black Lives Matter events are holding up copies of this book. The New Jim Crow reveals how mass incarceration has systematically disenfranchised, segregated, and stolen the lives of massive percentages of the Black population. With the school-to-prison pipelineputting more and more Black youth behind bars, it’s a crucial read for any educator.

6. The Mis-education of the Negro by Dr. Carter G. Woodson

The Mis-education of the Negro was published in 1933. Sadly, much of what Woodson describes is still relevant today. Woodson points to the harmful effects of a Eurocentric education system that teaches Black students to think of themselves as inferior, invisible, and detestable — an education that hinders them throughout their future lives. You don’t even have to buy the book; you can read it online over at History is a Weapon.

7. Drinking Coffee Elsewhere by ZZ Packer

The eight stories in Drinking Coffee Elsewhere tell of people looking for truth, people trying to fit in, people with big dreams, people just trying to make it. Yes, most of these characters are Black. Yet, despite the absurd notion that Black characters are unrelatable, these stories are profoundly human. Is it sad that we need reminders that Black people are people? Yep. Do we still need it? Yep. It’s also just a beautiful collection.

8. The Light of the World by Elizabeth Alexander

While the story Alexander tells here is one of loss, it is also one of love and joy and family. Black people don’t see enough of stories and images of Black love, joy, and family, so I know white people aren’t seeing enough of these stories either.

9. The Sisters Are Alright by Tamara Winfrey-Harris

All too often, the gaze with which white people look upon Black lives is one of pity. With all the negative portrayals, hard realities, and racism, it’s no wonder. But Black people are not community service projects, and pathologizing Black students or looking at them like wounded animals is be damaging, too. The Sisters Are Alright counters the stereotyped narratives of Black women, celebrating them instead of disparaging, pitying, or insulting them.

10. The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession by Dana Goldstein

If you want to change your future, you’ve got to know your history. Goldstein’s look at the history of teaching and schools in the U.S. takes on the hard topics, including the issue of race in the classroom and the necessity of teachers of colors in the classroom

Rick Lavoie Story: Taking A Beating to Avoid Reading

 

Published on Jun 2, 2014

“I was the youngest of three brothers. And in the first grade, my dad used to beat me. He used to beat me because he liked beating me. He didn’t need a reason to beat me. We’d be sitting at the kitchen table and he’d reach across the table and slap me in the face. He was an extraordinarily cruel man and he used to beat me for no reason. Generally, when my Dad beat me he beat me in the living room or the kitchen and I could just run away and go hide until he fell asleep. But when I did something wrong or made a mistake, I used to get what my brothers and I called a bathroom beating. A bathroom beating went like this: my father would take me, drag me into the bathroom, close the door behind us, lock the door, and then beat me until he got tired of beating me. And in a bathroom beating you couldn’t get away. You ran in the closet, he was there. You ran behind the toilet, he was there. You jumped in the shower, he was there. That was a bathroom beating when you did something wrong.

“In the first grade, I couldn’t read. I just couldn’t read. And I was so embarrassed that I couldn’t read. The way they used to teach reading in my school system when I was a kid, is Mrs. Donovan, the reading specialist from the district would come every other Thursday and she’d take all the kids in the first grade who couldn’t read and bring them to the front of the class and make them read out loud in front of the other kids. That was so embarrassing and humiliating for me that every other Thursday before Mrs. Donovan arrived I’d go into the boys’ room and take my reading glasses and twist them until they broke, or break one of the lenses, or pop one of the lenses out. Then when Mrs. Donovan would come I’d go up to her with the broken glasses and say, ‘Mrs. Donovan, my glasses are broken. I can’t read today.’ And I did that every other Thursday for a year with the full knowledge that when I got home I was going to get a bathroom beating for it; when I showed my father the broken glasses, that I was going to get a beating.”

The saddest part of that story is, I’ll bet you anything, if you look at that child’s file, some where Mrs. Donovan probably wrote that this kid is not motivated. You don’t break your glasses every other Thursday for a year unless you’re doing it on purpose. She must have known he was doing it on purpose and interpreted that the child was not motivated, which is so sad. That child was probably the most motivated child Mrs. Donavan will ever, ever have. His motivation was to avoid the humiliation. Imagine if she could have taken that motivation and injected that into his desire to learn to read. He was an extraordinarily motivated child.

I own a little 1972 Karmann Ghia. It’s my pride and joy. I love that little car. It’s very, very special to me. My wife bought it on our twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. It was manufactured the year we were married and I love that car. But if you told me in order to keep that car I’d have to take a beating twice a month I’d say, “Well, keep the car. It doesn’t mean that much to me.” I’m not that motivated to keep the car. This little boy was so motivated to avoid being embarrassed that he was willing to take a beating from a grown man twice a month. We need to understand the incredible impact that an inability to read has on the life span of a child into adulthood.