We Tried — And Failed — To Identify The Most Banned Book In America

Footnotes

  1. As the ALA itself notes on its website: “A challenge is defined as a formal, written complaint, filed with a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of content or appropriateness. The number of challenges reflects only incidents reported. We estimate that for every reported challenge, four or five remain unreported. Therefore, we do not claim comprehensiveness in recording challenges.” ^

From preschool through high school: 24 great books that show empathy, kindness

August 10
“When you read these books aloud, you can tell from their expressions that they are empathetic in relating to these characters. They understand what the characters are feeling,” says Sharon Rawlins, youth services specialist at the New Jersey State Library and president of the Collaborative Summer Library Program.

Here are her suggestions for books that embody that:

A Chair for My Mother” by Vera B. Williams (preschool-kindergarten)
When a little girl’s family loses their home and possessions, friends, neighbors, and family members pitch in with essential items and companionship. In their new home, the girl, her mother and her grandmother patiently save coins in a jar until they have enough to buy a comfortable armchair in which the women can rest after work.

The Nice Book” by David Ezra Stein (preschool-kindergarten)
We’re all guilty of using the vague phrase “be nice” when talking to children. Stein’s book breaks down that unhelpful admonition and turns it into specific advice. Each page carries a word or short phrase that instructs how to treat others with kindness and generosity. The simple illustrations of animals caring for one another demonstrate to young children such ideas as “when you get in a snit, don’t hit,” “love is meant to be passed on” and “look after someone little.”

Read more

“diversity-related” graduate education programs

Dear Colleagues,

Through its Cultural Studies, International Education, and Multicultural Education (CSIEME) program, the Department of Teaching and Learning, College of Education (COE) at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) is please to offer the following “diversity-related” graduate education programs—please share this information widely!
An M.Ed. (non-thesis) and an M.S. (thesis) in Multicultural Education.
An Ed.D. and a Ph.D. in Cultural Studies, International Education, and Multicultural Education.
A Chief Diversity Officers in Higher Education (CDOHE) graduate certificate [housed in the Department of Educational Psychology & Higher Education, collaboratively coordinated with the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
A Social Justice Studies (SJS) graduate certificate [housed in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program, collaboratively coordinated with the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs and the Department of Sociology (in the College of Liberal Arts (CLA)), with additional partners in the Department of Educational Psychology & Higher Education (COE) and the Department of History (CLA)].
Coming soon! A post-master’s graduate certificate in Multicultural Education [housed in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
Coming soon! A post-bachelor’s graduate certificate in Multicultural Education [h oused in the Department of Teaching and Learning through the CSIEME program.]
For more information on these programs, please visit: http://tl.unlv.edu/content/csieme/
Graduate assistantships may be available at both academic levels based on funding allocations, departmental teaching needs, and the number of students interested.
Again, please share this information widely with interested students and colleagues!
Best,
Christine
———
Christine Clark, Ed.D.
Professor & Senior Scholar in Multicultural Education
Founding Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion
346A Carlson Education Building (CEB)
Department of Teaching and Learning
College of Education
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box #453005
Las Vegas, NV 89154.3005
702.895.3888 Office Telephone
702.895.2944 Office Facsimile

7 Reasons Why ‘Colorblindness’ Contributes to Racism Instead of Solves It

Source http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/02/colorblindness-adds-to-racism/

 

Author’s Notes: While this article argues that colorblindness as a concept is problematic, I’d also like to acknowledge that colorblindness as a term is problematic, as it could easily be considered an example of ableist language. In the end, I chose to use the term, but I hope that in ridding ourselves of the concept, we can also rid ourselves of the term.

Thank you to my former students who have shared their race-based experiences, enabling me to write this article.

You’ve heard it said before. You might have been the one to say it.

“I don’t see color. I just see people.”

Or maybe: “We are all just people.”

Or it might have been “…” – the sound of silence.

Such comments (and racial avoidance) have a name: colorblindness.

The colorblind approach to race is not an accidental phenomenon; rather, it is the result of an education – a training – that many of us have received, especially White Americans.

Many of us are taught from an early age that talking about race – even just acknowledging race – is a no-no.

In some ways, colorblindness makes sense: Race can be uncomfortable – its mere mention can thicken the air with tension.

Moreover, this country’s racist history is deeply uncomfortable: “Let’s just start fresh in a world where we don’t acknowledge racial differences and, with luck, we can move beyond our racist past. After all, this country is a big melting pot anyway.”

Unfortunately, like many other lessons we have been taught – drinking juice is good for you,complimenting appearances is always nice, menstruation is gross and shameful, asking Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders where they are really from is okay – colorblind ideology is fraught with problems and pitfalls.

Before I elaborate, please don’t feel judged if you have espoused such an approach in the past.

As I mentioned, how could many of us not do so after years of training?

I have spent nearly 15 years in public high school classrooms, and my students – particularly my students of color – have provided a wealth of evidence that, when it comes to colorblindness, we desperately require an alternate training.

Since it’s the responsibility of White folks to educate ourselves and each other (and not expect people of color to be our trainers), I encourage you take to heart the seven reasons I’ve already been taught:

1. Colorblindness Invalidates People’s Identities

Because of the prevalence and history of racism, just the word “race” can conjure negative connotations.

………..  read more …………