Tag Archives: Lesson Plans

The Whiteness Project

POV Interactive Shorts are a new digital series allowing audiences to engage with documentaries on a deeper level using new technologies and new paradigms in storytelling. Find out more »

Whiteness Project: Inside the White Caucasian Box is the first installment of a multiplatform investigation into how Americans who identify as “white” experience their ethnicity. Director and Producer Whitney Dow discusses the making of this collection of 24 interviews filmed in Buffalo, NY in July 2014.

 

view at ……  http://www.pbs.org/pov/blog/povdocs/2014/10/pov-interactive-shorts-qa-with-whitney-dow-whiteness-project/#.VEkZGovF-Jb

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Jane Elliott on the Oprah Winfrey Show (1992), Blue Eyes Brown Eyes Exercise

Published on Apr 15, 2014

This Excerpt from 1992 episode with teacher Jane Elliott’s showed “The Oprah Winfrey Show” at its best. The Iowa schoolteacher speaks after applied her famous blue-eyes-vs.-brown-eyes experiment to the show’s studio audience, separating the people on the basis of eye pigment and giving one group preferential treatment over the other; by the time the show started, the resentment fostered by this brief period of inequality spilled over into visible, simmering hostility. As a statement about the roots of racism, Elliott’s exercise was powerful stuff — the fact that it was initially designed to impart the lesson for grade-school children didn’t dim its impact on the show’s adult viewers.

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Professor’s TEDx Talk about Native American Mascots Selected as Editor’s Pick by TED

Professor’s TEDx Talk about Native American Mascots Selected as Editor’s Pick by TED
Author: TEDxUOregon, Portland State University
Posted: June 12, 2014

This spring, Indigenous Nations Studies program Director and Professor Dr. Cornel Pewewardy spoke in Eugene as part of TEDxUOregon. Professor Pewewardy, who is a nationally recognized expert on Native American mascots in schools and in the media, gave a talk entitled, “Walk a Mile in My Redface: On Ending the Colonial in Schools, Sports Culture, Mass Media and Civic Life.”

Professor Pewewardy’s talk was recently selected as an “Editor’s Pick” amongst thousands of talks for a feature on the TED website.

Professor Pewewardy is Comanche-Kiowa and an enrolled member of the Comanche Nation of Oklahoma. He was named “Teacher of the Year” by the National Indian Education Association in 2009 and was awarded the Carl A. Grant Multicultural Research Award by the National Association for Multicultural Education in 2011.

About TEDx
In the spirit of “Ideas Worth Spreading,” TEDx is a program of local, independently organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. A combination of live presenters and TED Talks videos help to spark deep conversation and connections in the community. Over the past five years, there have been more than 10,000 TEDx events in 167 countries.

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Liberation of Dachau by Japanese Americans 552nd Field Artillery Battalion 442nd RCT April 29th 1945

522FABNliberatecamp

 

by Nihomachi Outreach Committee San Jose

(This article is reposted with permission of NOC.
Please visit their site by clicking on the link above)

The war in Europe was coming to a close as the Allies raced across Germany to Berlin. Elements of the US 7th Army chased the remnants of the German army retreating into Germany. Among the fastest moving units was the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion a Nisei (Second generation Japanese American) unit that was originally attached to the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team. The 442nd won the most decorations for any American unit for its size during WW2. The unit would win 7 Presidential Citations (5 while rescuing the Lost Texas Battalion in France 1944), 20 Medals of Honor (America’s highest decoration for valor) and over 9000 Purple Hearts (decorations for wounds suffered in combat). The 522 had a reputation for having the fastest and most accurate fire in the US Army. They were hand picked by Gen. Eisenhower (Commander of Allied Forces in Europe) to help lead the attack into Germany.

The 522nd liberated several of the sub camps near Dachau and actually opened the main gate at the Dachau concentration camp. Some 5000 survivors of the Dachau concentration camp were liberated by elements of the 522 on April 29th 1945.

Dachau was established in 1933 as the Nazi regime rose to power. The infamous camp was in 12 years of existence with some 206,000 prisoners .Dachau had some 30 sub camps (smaller forced labor and/or POW camps) located near adjacent towns. It was the site of mass exterminations, executions, and death marches. Some 5000 inmates were liberated mostly Jewish, Russian, French, Polish civilians and Allied POW’s.

The Story of Sgt. Oiye

On April 29th 1945, Staff Sgt. George Oiye was member of a forward observer team (patrols to search for targets for artillery to shoot ) for artillery battery C leading the 7th Army racing into Germany. Elements of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion were spread out over a 30 mile radius. They had orders to destroy military targets in Munich and to demolish the headquarters of the dreaded SS. They also had warnings to be on the look out for top Nazis such as Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun (Hitler’s mistress). They chased the retreating German units,captured and disarmed them. According to 522 records they were the first Allied unit to reach Dachau.

Unintentional Liberators

“We weren’t supposed to be there” said Oiye. Since they were spread out over such a wide area (30 KM) and Dachau was so big they simply ran into it. Japanese American soldiers shot the lock of the main gate of the outer perimeter fences. Then opened the barbed wire gates of the infamous crematorium the site were thousands of Jewish prisoners bodies were burned into ashes. The building had tall smoke stacks and large ovens with bodies smoldering still inside. Prisoners were often gassed or died of the harsh slave labor conditions at Dachau.

“A Hard Thing”
Oiye explained his reaction to visiting the infamous camp: He was mainly on the muddy roads out side the camp when it started to snow. “It was very cold and he saw the prisoners shivering. Some were in very bad shape,”emaciated, sick, diseased, bugs crawling on them and dying” He recalled the stripped suits they wore and some had no shoes. Oiye and his fellow soldiers gave the prisoners their extra gloves, bed rolls, and food. His reaction to the prisoners: “we were not prepared to deal with coming across a concentration camp.” “We came across by accident and were not prepared. It was a hard thing” He remembered that he ” felt bewildered, then angry and fearful. ” Oiye explained the sense of guilt “that mankind had transgressed so far…. the worst case of sin I know of.”

“War was one thing but that kind of treatment of mankind; thats is not normal” Oiye stated. Some of the 522nd soldiers found ladies handbags made of human skin. He could remember seeing “intricate” tattoos on these handbags. Gloves and lampshades were also found to made of human skin. Other soldiers reported that dozens of prisoners that were horribly tortured and murdered.

 

read more …………

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Multilingual Children: Beyond Myths and Toward Best Practices

     
Multilingual Children: Beyond Myths and Toward Best Practices

If you’re looking for current resources on how to conceptualize and implement supports for children who are multilingual, you will enjoy this issue of the Social Policy Report. It considers issues that range from the strengths of multilingual children (and the practices early childhood professionals can use to develop those strengths) to who is multilingual, with thoughtful attention to supporting young children who may speak different dialects.

Access the entire issue at http://www.srcd.org/sites/default/files/documents/E-News/spr_27_4.pdf

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Esta Tierra Es Tuya (This Land Is Your Land)

 

“Woody Guthrie wrote this classic in 1940 and originally had a message of inclusiveness. It was inspired by the plight of “Okies,” displaced Great Plains farmers unwelcomed in California when they sought work during the 1930’s Dust Bowl Depression Era. It was dramatized in the book and movie, The Grapes of Wrath. This Spanish version was written by Sones de Mexico Ensemble. Its norteño version remains relevant 71 later and speaks of America’s debate over immigration.”

 

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Black Leadership

MLK unjust laws

 

Black Leadership

 “In this period of transition and growing social change, there is a dire need for leaders who are calm and yet positive, leaders who avoid the extremes of “hotheadedness” and Uncle Tomism.”  The urgency of the hour calls for leaders of wise judgment and sound integrity—leaders not in love with money, but in love with justice; leaders not in love with publicity, but in love with humanity; leaders who can subject their particular egos to the greatness of the cause.”

 Martin Luther King, Jr.

Facing the Challenge of a New Age, 1956

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Bringing Art to Life

This is great. Enjoy. “Night Watch” by Rembrandt.

Advertising the opening of the renewed Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam—”Night Watch” by Rembrandt, brought to life! 

The Rijksmuseum museum in Holland had an idea: Let’s bring the art to the people and then, hopefully, they will come to see more—,at the museum. They took one Rembrandt painting from 1642, Night Watch and brought to life the characters in it, placed them in a busy mall and the rest you can see for yourself!

BEFORE YOU CLICK on the link below…..take a good look at the painting below. Then click to enjoy the video. 

NightWat

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