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For UConn, 9 Titles Since Title IX
Apr 10th, 2014 by

Editorial
The Hartford Courant7:09 p.m. EDT, April 9, 2014

More thoughts on UConn‘s spectacular showing in the NCAAwomen’s and men’s basketball tournaments this week:

•This is “Title Nine” for the UConn women, as an emailer observed — their ninth NCAA title and an opportunity to reflect on Title IX, the federal law that banned discrimination in high school and college sports four decades ago. The law opened the door for millions of young women who wanted to play sports but were denied the opportunity.

The numbers tell that story. In 1972, fewer than 300,000 young women played high school sports. When Title IX celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2012, the number had reached 3.2 million.

At the college level, the number of female athletes went from fewer than 32,000 to more than 193,000, according to the National Women’s Law Center.

The field is not yet level — women still do not get an equal share of playing opportunities, athletic investment or scholarship dollars — but things have greatly improved.

That’s obvious at UConn, which didn’t even have a women’s basketball team the year Title IX was passed. Now the brilliant Huskies are winning national championships on ESPN. It’s one of the rare occasions when Congress got one right. Title IX begat Title Nine.

•The NCAA National Championship trophies for both men and women are stylistically undistinguished, bland as a salesman-of-the-month award, and don’t reflect the grandeur of the accomplishment.

With all of the artistic talent at NCAA member institutions, this is the best they can do?

Then again, most sports trophies aren’t much to look at. It makes one appreciate the few that are, such as the Claret Jug at the British Open.

•Has the practice of politicians making “friendly wagers” gotten both out of control and a little old?

This was moderately amusing a few years ago, when the governors of states whose teams were in the finals began betting local products (maple syrup, whiskey and so on) on the outcome. But now lieutenant governors, congressmen and senators are also in on the act. It’s become like a thrice-told joke: no longer that amusing.

On the other hand, since UConn is a combined 13-0 in NCAA men’s and women’s championship games, it’s too bad they didn’t bet real money. That might have closed the deficit.

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School Discipline Guidance and Title IX Webinar
Apr 2nd, 2014 by

The National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education,
American Federation of Teachers,
National Education Association, and
American Association of University Women present:

School Discipline Guidance and Title IX Webinar

 Tuesday, April 1, 2014

3:00pm to 4:00pm EST

 Click the link below to play it:

https://aftevent.webex.com/aftevent/lsr.php?RCID=b6ec3a4ae8787e70fe949e55564b3eaf

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Supreme Court declines to review I ♥ boobies bracelet decision
Mar 20th, 2014 by

Source: http://legalclips.nsba.org/2014/03/20/supreme-court-declines-to-review-i-%e2%99%a5-boobies-bracelet-decision/?utm_source=NSBA+e-Newsletter+Subscribers&utm_campaign=eb3c3dcf2e-Legal+Clips+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_498fb22860-eb3c3dcf2e-312496857

Supreme Court declines to review I ♥ boobies bracelet decision

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected Easton Area School District’s (EASD) petition asking the Court to review the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit’s en banc decision in B.H. v. EASD, according to an Express-Times report in the Pocono Record. The Court’s rejection leaves in place the Third Circuit’s 2013 decision striking down a ban on students wearing I ♥ boobies bracelets. The precedent set by the Third Circuit that the bracelets represent a form of protected free speech applies to Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. The American Civil Liberties Union brought the suit against EASD on behalf of Easton Area Middle School students, who wore the bracelets in October 2010 despite a school-wide ban and were suspended from school.

Noting that very few cases reach the Supreme Court level, John Freund, the attorney representing EASD, said he was disappointed nonetheless. ”Local school authorities need the ability to enforce dress codes and maintain reasonable decorum of the manner of expression in an educational environment, while respecting the legitimate rights of students to express themselves,” Freund said.

In Freund’s opinion, the Third Circuit Court’s decision departed from previous Supreme Court precedent on the subject, which likely means a similar case will be heard sometime in the future. ”Indications are that the Supreme Court will one day revisit that question,” Freund wrote. “Unfortunately, it will take more lawsuits, more attorneys’ fees and more chaos in the classroom before we get the answer.”

Mary Catherine Roper, an ACLU attorney who represented the students, applauded the Supreme Court’s decision. She said the Third Circuit Court’s decision opened the door to protecting student speech on political and social issues, even if the language used is sometimes considered lewd.

- See more at: http://legalclips.nsba.org/2014/03/20/supreme-court-declines-to-review-i-%e2%99%a5-boobies-bracelet-decision/?utm_source=NSBA+e-Newsletter+Subscribers&utm_campaign=eb3c3dcf2e-Legal+Clips+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_498fb22860-eb3c3dcf2e-312496857#sthash.mNSxXD9e.dpuf

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More good data debunking single sex education claims
Feb 3rd, 2014 by

Contact: APA Public Affairs

public.affairs@apa.org
202-336-5700
American Psychological Association

Single-sex education unlikely to offer advantage over coed schools, research finds

Analysis questions common assumption single-sex schools improve educational environment, achievement

WASHINGTON – Single-sex education does not educate girls and boys any better than coed schools, according to research published by the American Psychological Association analyzing 184 studies of more than 1.6 million students from around the world. The findings are published online Feb. 3 in the APA journal Psychological Bulletin.

“Proponents of single-sex schools argue that separating boys and girls increases students’ achievement and academic interest,” said author Janet Shibley Hyde, PhD, of University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Our comprehensive analysis of the data shows that these advantages are trivial and, in many cases, nonexistent.”

A separate analysis of just U.S. schools had similar findings. Researchers also looked at studies that examined coed schools that offered single-sex instruction in certain subjects and found no significant benefits for boys or girls in these cases.

Some studies showed modest benefits for both boys and girls in math performance in single-sex schools, but not for science performance. However, these advantages in math were not evident in studies with more rigorous research methods.

The analysis, funded by the National Science Foundation, included studies of K-12 schools published from 1968 to 2013. Among the studies, 57 used stronger research methods, such as studies in Trinidad and Tobago and Korea that randomly assigned thousands of students to single-sex or coed schools and tracked their outcomes. Other examples of more rigorous studies controlled for pre-existing differences between students, such as testing students before and after they enrolled in either a single-sex or coed institution. The total sample included 1,663,662 participants in 21 countries. The studies examined students’ performance and attitudes in math and science; verbal skills; and attitudes about school, gender stereotyping, aggression, victimization and body image. They did not find sufficient evidence to show any difference in these attitudes between boys and girls in single-sex or coed classrooms.

Theories that single-sex education may be better for students have included the idea that without boys in the classroom, girls would be able to thrive in traditionally male-dominated subjects, such as math and science. “The theoretical approach termed ‘girl power’ argues that girls lag behind boys in some subjects in coed classrooms,” said co-author Erin Pahlke, PhD, of Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash. “This is not supported by our analysis and, moreover, girls’ educational aspirations were not higher in single-sex schools.”

The authors noted the lack of studies on single-sex education among low-income students and ethnic minorities, particularly in the U.S., and recommended further research in these populations.

###

Article: ”The Effects of Single-Sex Compared With Coeducational Schooling on Students’ Performance and Attitudes: A Meta-Analysis,” Erin Pahlke, PhD, Whitman College; Janet Shibley Hyde, PhD, and Carlie M. Allison, MS, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Psychological Bulletin, online Feb. 3, 2014.

Contact: Erin Pahlke, PhD, pahlke@whitman.edu and at (202) 907-6247 or Janet Shibley Hyde,jshyde@wisc.edu, and at (608) 262-9522.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA’s membership includes more than 134,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

http://www.apa.org

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Maine Supreme Court just handed down a ruling in the case of the trans-girl that was denied the use of the girl’s bathroom.
Jan 30th, 2014 by

NOTE – transgender students in CT have the same rights under PA 11-55 –

http://www.cga.ct.gov/2011/ACT/PA/2011PA-00055-R00HB-06599-PA.htm

See also – http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/equity/title_ix/guidelines_for_schools_on_gender_identity_and_expression2012oct4.pdf

 

Maine Supreme Court just handed down a ruling in the case of the trans-girl that was denied the use of the girl’s bathroom.
http://www.glad.org/current/item/breakthrough-ruling-in-favor-of-transgender-student

Breakthrough Ruling in Favor of Transgender Student

Transgender Students Must Have Full Access to School Facilities, Says Maine High Court

Today, Maine’s highest court ruled that denying a transgender girl the use of the girls’ restroom at her school violated her rights under Maine’s Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination against transgender people. The decision in GLAD’s lawsuit Doe v. Clenchy marks the first time a state court has ruled that transgender students must be allowed to use the bathrooms that match who they are.

The ruling stated in part, “[The school] agreed with Susan’s family and counselors that, for this purpose (as for virtually all others), Susan is a girl.  Based upon its determination that Susan is a girl, and in keeping with the information provided to the school by Susan’s family, her therapists, and experts in the field of transgender children, the school determined that Susan should use the girls’ bathroom.”

“This is a momentous decision that marks a huge breakthrough for transgender young people,” said Jennifer Levi, director of GLAD’s Transgender Rights Project, who argued the case before the Maine Law Court on June 12. “Schools have a responsibility to create a learning environment that meets and balances the needs of all kids and allows every student to succeed. For transgender students this includes access to all school facilities, programs, and extracurricular activities in a way that is consistent with their gender identity.”

“A transgender girl is a girl and must be treated as such in all respects, including using the girls’ restroom. This ruling is consistent with what educators and human rights commissions – including the Maine Human Rights Commission — around the country have concluded,” said GLAD Senior Attorney Bennett Klein, who was co-counsel with Levi in the case.

The litigation arose after officials at an Orono elementary school denied Nicole Maines, a transgender girl who was then in fifth grade, use of the girls’ restroom. The school had previously allowed Nicole to use the girls’ room but reversed course after the misconduct of one male student who followed Nicole into that facility.

“We are very grateful and relieved that the Court said our daughter should not be singled out for different treatment at school simply because she is transgender,” said Wayne Maines, Nicole’s father. “As parents all we’ve ever wanted is for Nicole and her brother Jonas to get a good education and to be treated just like their classmates, and that didn’t happen for Nicole. What happened to my daughter was extremely painful for her and our whole family, but we can now close this very difficult chapter in our lives. We are very happy knowing that because of this ruling, no other transgender child in Maine will have to endure what Nicole experienced.”

GLAD and Jodi L. Nofsinger of Berman & Simmons, P.A. represented Susan in the lawsuit.

Learn more about the case and read previous case documents here. http://www.glad.org/work/cases/doe-v.-clenchy

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