Notices of Non-Discrimination: posting in other languages

A school district must publish a notice that it does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational
programs or activities. The notice must also state that inquiries concerning the application of Title IX and its
implementing regulations may be referred to the Title IX coordinator or to OCR. The notice must be displayed
prominently in each announcement, bulletin, catalog, or application form used in connection with the recruitment
of students or employees.

The continuous notice must be in each language where there is a community of those language speakers.

In New York City the notice of non-discrimination (continuous notice) as well as the annual notice are provided (printed, posted in schools and in the community, and posted on the web) in nine languages:

http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/GeneralCounsel/Investigative/OEO/KeyDocuments/notifynondiscrimpolicy.htm

The following is from that page.

Notification of Non-Discrimination Policy

It is the policy of the Department of Education of the City of New York to provide equal employment opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, creed, ethnicity, national origin, alienage, citizenship status, age, marital status, partnership status, disability, sexual orientation, gender (sex), military status, prior record of arrest or conviction (except as permitted by law) predisposing genetic characteristics, or status as a victim of domestic violence, sexual offenses and stalking, and to maintain an environment free of harassment on any of the above-noted grounds, including sexual harassment or retaliation.

It is the policy of the New York City Department of Education to provide equal educational opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, creed, ethnicity, national origin, alienage, citizenship status, disability, sexual orientation, gender (sex) or weight and to maintain an environment free of harassment on the basis of any of these grounds, including sexual harassment or retaliation.

This policy is in accordance with Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, Section 503 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Fair Labor Standards Amendments of 1974, Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Civil Rights Act of 1991, New York State and City Human Rights Laws and Provisions of Anti-Discrimination in Collective Bargaining Agreements of the Department of Education of the City of New York.

NOTIFICATION OF NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY postings should be conspicuously displayed in universal areas throughout all Department of Education sites, in appropriate languages.

Postings inform employees, parents of students, students, and applicants for employment of the Department’s policy on Non-Discrimination. ( Available in 9 Languagues)

Copies of the PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY postings can be printed via the following links:

ENGLISH (Version)

ARABIC (Version)

BENGALI (Version)

CHINESE (Version)

HAITIAN CREOLE (Version)

KOREAN (Version)

RUSSIAN (Version)

SPANISH (Version)

URDU (Version)

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Tips for Talking to Children About Marriage Equality

Tips for Talking to Children About Marriage Equality

Posted by Rohmteen Mokhtari, June 26, 2013

With all the media attention on the Supreme Court’s historic marriage equality rulings, some parents and teachers may initially feel a little anxious about discussing the topic with their children or students.

Sometimes talking to children about LGBT issues seem difficult, in part, because as adults we haven’t had a chance to consider what we want to say and how we would respond to questions. Often when discussing a new topic, we rely on past experiences to help us out. However, many of us don’t have much experience talking about LGBT topics. Therefore, our past experience doesn’t help us out.

Fortunately, with just a little forethought and preparation this can be a great teachable moment.

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As Title IX turns 41, nine notable US female Olympic athletes.

SOURCE: http://olympictalk.nbcsports.com/2013/06/23/as-title-ix-turns-41s-nine-notable-us-female-olympic-athletes/

Call it a double. June 23 is Olympic Day and the 41st anniversary of the passage of Title IX. Here, to commemorate, are nine female Olympians who made an impact in their sport.

  • One of the greatest female athletes of all time, Jackie Joyner-Kersee left a lasting impression on the sport of track and field with her six Olympic medals in heptathlon and long jump. Between 1988 and 1996, Joyner-Kersee collected three golds, one silver, and two bronze medals at four straight Olympic Games. Her heptathlon score from the 1988 Seoul Games still stands as the women’s world record.
  • On the track, Florence Griffith Joyner’s speed won her five Olympic medals, but it was the sprinter’s style that captured the attention of the American public. Flo-Jo, who won three golds and two silvers at the 1984 and 1988 Games, still holds world records in the 100m and 200m.
  • In her fourth and final Olympic appearance at the 1994 Lillehammer Games, speed skater Bonnie Blair became the first American woman with five gold medals, capitalizing on the two-year gap between Olympics due to the change in the Winter Games cycle. Blair, who collected three Olympic titles in the 500m, is still the only American to win the same individual event at three consecutive Olympic Winter Games.
  • The Williams sisters’ dominance in the sport of tennis is felt on every level of competition, including the Olympics, where they have had unmatched success. Venus and Serena have each won a singles title at the Games — Serena most recently in London — but they are unstoppable as a doubles team, going 15-0 at three Olympics on their way to three gold medals.
  • The U.S. has almost always been a basketball powerhouse at the Games, and Lisa Leslie was one of the sport’s stalwarts from 1996-2008, when the women’s team won four straight golds. She closed out her Olympic career with 488 points, the most of any American — male or female — at the Games.
  • Beach volleyball duo Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-Treanor pocketed three Olympic gold medals from 2004 to 2012. Their relentless pursuit of perfection led to a 21-0 record at the Games, with only one dropped set ever in Olympic competition.
  • The most decorated American gymnast of all time, Shannon Miller grabbed two silver and three bronze medals at the 1992 Barcelona Games, but it was her contributions to the team at the 1996 Atlanta Games that are most memorable. Her balance beam performance, for which she won an individual gold, also helped the U.S. win its first women’s individual all-around title at the Olympics.
  • Quite possibly the most well-known women’s soccer player ever, Mia Hamm (pictured above) was also one of the best. She scored 158 international goals over 275 games, which stood as an all-time record until Abby Wambach surpassed her last week. She made her final Olympic appearance at the 2004 Athens Games, where she won her second gold and third overall medal.
  • Defenseman Angela Ruggiero saw the women’s ice hockey tournament through its first four Olympics, winning a medal at each Games, including a gold in Nagano, where the event made its debut. Though she retired in 2011, she remains involved in the Games by serving as a member of the International Olympic Committee.
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ESPN Films’s Nine for IX docuseries

Imagine if some of the most iconic moments in sports history never came to be: members of the USA soccer team ripping off their jerseys in pure joy after winning the 1999 Women’s World Cup, the Williams sisters dominating the U.S. Open in 2001, the University of Connecticut women’s basketball team winning an unprecedented 90 consecutive games—the longest streak in both men’s and women’s NCAA basketball.

These big points in sports owe thanks to a 37-word amendment, Title IX, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year. While ESPN commemorated that anniversary with wall-to-wall coverage on its website of the gains women have made, it also realized the need to keep the conversation going.

“It shouldn’t only be anniversaries,” says Libby Geist, associate director of development at ESPN Films. “We should always be highlighting women.”

“The result of that yearlong reflection is ESPNw and ESPN Films’s Nine for IXdocuseries, which airs July 2 and continues throughout the summer. The nine episodes, all directed by women, feature some instantly recognizable names: Venus Williams, Pat Summitt, and Mia Hamm. Others are harder to place, like sports journalist Lisa Olson, who fought sexual harassment by New England Patriots’ football players; late scuba diver Audrey Mestre, whose push to complete the deepest dive ever led to her death; and runner Mary Decker, whose promising Olympic dreams were nixed because of a collision with another racer.

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Transgender 6-year-old wins civil rights case to use girls’ bathroom

A transgender 6-year-old who identifies as a female should be allowed to use the girls’ bathroom at her elementary school even though she was born a male, the Colorado Civil Rights Division ruled on Sunday.

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