OCR Finds State Agency Did Not Correctly Apply Title IX to Annual Reviews of Scholastic Athletic Programs

SOURCE: http://title-ix.blogspot.com/2017/09/ocr-finds-state-agency-did-not.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TitleIxBlog+%28Title+IX+Blog%29

OCR Finds State Agency Did Not Correctly Apply Title IX to Annual Reviews of Scholastic Athletic Programs

Posted: 29 Sep 2017 12:55 PM PDT

In Washington State, the state agency in charge of public schools (called the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, OSPI) receives federal funding and administers some of that funding to local school districts.  As such, OSPI is required to comply with Title IX and may not aid or perpetuate discrimination by funding school districts who do not comply with Title IX. To that end, OSPI monitors the Title IX compliance of its school districts. Among other things, OSPI collects and reviews the self-evaluations that it requires school districts to annually conduct of its athletics programs’ participation rates.

The Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights began an investigation into OSPI’s Title IX monitoring process in 2011, after receiving hundreds of complaints about Title IX violations in Washington’s public schools’ athletics programs. This week OCR announced its conclusion that OSPI was not properly applying the three-part test when reviewing the school districts’ self-evaluations of compliance.

The three-part test requires an athletic program subject to Title IX to either (1) ensure that percentage of athletic opportunities for each sex is substantially proportionate to the percentage of each sex in the student body; OR (2) that the program has a history and continuing practice of expanding opportunities for the underrepresented sex; OR (3) that the interests and abilities of the underrepresented sex are being met.

OCR did not find any problems with how the OSPI was applying parts 2 or 3, but it did find fault with the way it determined compliance with part 1. In particular, OSPI only found that schools failed to comply with this part if it would have taken more than 15-20 (depending on the size of the school) new opportunities for the underrepresented sex to bring the school into proportionality. In contrast, OCR has said that except when disproportionality is caused by natural fluctuations in enrollment, the only time a school does not have to be in exact proportionality is if the number of new opportunities needed to reach proportionality is smaller than the number needed for any new viable team.

Given that there are lots of sports that can run with 15 or fewer students, it is not surprising that OCR found “some instances” where OSPI “perpetuated discrimination” prohibited by Title IX by permitting some school to pass the review when they should not have. OSPI is now obligated to modify its practice so that it applies the appropriate standard going forward, and is subject to monitoring by OCR to ensure it does so.

I thought this enforcement action was noteworthy because of its state-wide impact. In the past, complainants have tried to focuses OCR’s attention on widespread noncompliance by filing dozens of complaints at once against school districts who do not appear to comply with the first part of the three part test. OCR has found grounds to dismiss these complaints without investigation or resolution, probably because of the practical limitations of actually conducting all of those simultaneous investigations. But if OCR keeps close track of how state agencies that distribute federal funding are applying Title IX, the agency can have still have state-wide impact. I wonder if we will see more these kinds of investigations initiated in other states. 

Share

New York district settles Title IX suit, agrees to build softball facility

The Batavia City School District has settled a Title IX suit brought on behalf of softball players alleging that the district provided girls with substandard playing fields. Continue reading…

Share

For UConn, 9 Titles Since Title IX

Source: 
Editorial
The Hartford Courant7:09 p.m. EDT, April 9, 2014

More thoughts on UConn‘s spectacular showing in the NCAAwomen’s and men’s basketball tournaments this week:

•This is “Title Nine” for the UConn women, as an emailer observed — their ninth NCAA title and an opportunity to reflect on Title IX, the federal law that banned discrimination in high school and college sports four decades ago. The law opened the door for millions of young women who wanted to play sports but were denied the opportunity.

The numbers tell that story. In 1972, fewer than 300,000 young women played high school sports. When Title IX celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2012, the number had reached 3.2 million.

At the college level, the number of female athletes went from fewer than 32,000 to more than 193,000, according to the National Women’s Law Center.

The field is not yet level — women still do not get an equal share of playing opportunities, athletic investment or scholarship dollars — but things have greatly improved.

That’s obvious at UConn, which didn’t even have a women’s basketball team the year Title IX was passed. Now the brilliant Huskies are winning national championships on ESPN. It’s one of the rare occasions when Congress got one right. Title IX begat Title Nine.

•The NCAA National Championship trophies for both men and women are stylistically undistinguished, bland as a salesman-of-the-month award, and don’t reflect the grandeur of the accomplishment.

With all of the artistic talent at NCAA member institutions, this is the best they can do?

Then again, most sports trophies aren’t much to look at. It makes one appreciate the few that are, such as the Claret Jug at the British Open.

•Has the practice of politicians making “friendly wagers” gotten both out of control and a little old?

This was moderately amusing a few years ago, when the governors of states whose teams were in the finals began betting local products (maple syrup, whiskey and so on) on the outcome. But now lieutenant governors, congressmen and senators are also in on the act. It’s become like a thrice-told joke: no longer that amusing.

On the other hand, since UConn is a combined 13-0 in NCAA men’s and women’s championship games, it’s too bad they didn’t bet real money. That might have closed the deficit.

Share

As Title IX turns 41, nine notable US female Olympic athletes.

SOURCE: http://olympictalk.nbcsports.com/2013/06/23/as-title-ix-turns-41s-nine-notable-us-female-olympic-athletes/

Call it a double. June 23 is Olympic Day and the 41st anniversary of the passage of Title IX. Here, to commemorate, are nine female Olympians who made an impact in their sport.

  • One of the greatest female athletes of all time, Jackie Joyner-Kersee left a lasting impression on the sport of track and field with her six Olympic medals in heptathlon and long jump. Between 1988 and 1996, Joyner-Kersee collected three golds, one silver, and two bronze medals at four straight Olympic Games. Her heptathlon score from the 1988 Seoul Games still stands as the women’s world record.
  • On the track, Florence Griffith Joyner’s speed won her five Olympic medals, but it was the sprinter’s style that captured the attention of the American public. Flo-Jo, who won three golds and two silvers at the 1984 and 1988 Games, still holds world records in the 100m and 200m.
  • In her fourth and final Olympic appearance at the 1994 Lillehammer Games, speed skater Bonnie Blair became the first American woman with five gold medals, capitalizing on the two-year gap between Olympics due to the change in the Winter Games cycle. Blair, who collected three Olympic titles in the 500m, is still the only American to win the same individual event at three consecutive Olympic Winter Games.
  • The Williams sisters’ dominance in the sport of tennis is felt on every level of competition, including the Olympics, where they have had unmatched success. Venus and Serena have each won a singles title at the Games — Serena most recently in London — but they are unstoppable as a doubles team, going 15-0 at three Olympics on their way to three gold medals.
  • The U.S. has almost always been a basketball powerhouse at the Games, and Lisa Leslie was one of the sport’s stalwarts from 1996-2008, when the women’s team won four straight golds. She closed out her Olympic career with 488 points, the most of any American — male or female — at the Games.
  • Beach volleyball duo Kerri Walsh Jennings and Misty May-Treanor pocketed three Olympic gold medals from 2004 to 2012. Their relentless pursuit of perfection led to a 21-0 record at the Games, with only one dropped set ever in Olympic competition.
  • The most decorated American gymnast of all time, Shannon Miller grabbed two silver and three bronze medals at the 1992 Barcelona Games, but it was her contributions to the team at the 1996 Atlanta Games that are most memorable. Her balance beam performance, for which she won an individual gold, also helped the U.S. win its first women’s individual all-around title at the Olympics.
  • Quite possibly the most well-known women’s soccer player ever, Mia Hamm (pictured above) was also one of the best. She scored 158 international goals over 275 games, which stood as an all-time record until Abby Wambach surpassed her last week. She made her final Olympic appearance at the 2004 Athens Games, where she won her second gold and third overall medal.
  • Defenseman Angela Ruggiero saw the women’s ice hockey tournament through its first four Olympics, winning a medal at each Games, including a gold in Nagano, where the event made its debut. Though she retired in 2011, she remains involved in the Games by serving as a member of the International Olympic Committee.
Share

ESPN Films’s Nine for IX docuseries

Imagine if some of the most iconic moments in sports history never came to be: members of the USA soccer team ripping off their jerseys in pure joy after winning the 1999 Women’s World Cup, the Williams sisters dominating the U.S. Open in 2001, the University of Connecticut women’s basketball team winning an unprecedented 90 consecutive games—the longest streak in both men’s and women’s NCAA basketball.

These big points in sports owe thanks to a 37-word amendment, Title IX, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year. While ESPN commemorated that anniversary with wall-to-wall coverage on its website of the gains women have made, it also realized the need to keep the conversation going.

“It shouldn’t only be anniversaries,” says Libby Geist, associate director of development at ESPN Films. “We should always be highlighting women.”

“The result of that yearlong reflection is ESPNw and ESPN Films’s Nine for IXdocuseries, which airs July 2 and continues throughout the summer. The nine episodes, all directed by women, feature some instantly recognizable names: Venus Williams, Pat Summitt, and Mia Hamm. Others are harder to place, like sports journalist Lisa Olson, who fought sexual harassment by New England Patriots’ football players; late scuba diver Audrey Mestre, whose push to complete the deepest dive ever led to her death; and runner Mary Decker, whose promising Olympic dreams were nixed because of a collision with another racer.

read more …………….

 

Share

Copyright © All Rights Reserved · Green Hope Theme by Sivan & schiy · Proudly powered by WordPress